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Monday, March 12

  1. 1:33 pm
  2. page Social Studies edited Hudson's Bay Company: http://www2.hbc.com/hbcheritage/history/timeline/hbc/ CURRENT EVENTSCriter…
    Hudson's Bay Company:
    http://www2.hbc.com/hbcheritage/history/timeline/hbc/
    CURRENT EVENTSCriteria for report:1. Date of event2. Source of news story (newspaper, tv, radio, etc)3. Who was involved?4. Where did it take place?5. What are the key points?6. Your personal thoughts on the story.*Paper should be MINIMUM one page single spaced in length*
    How is the aboriginal way of life affected by where they live in Canada?
    5S student research and findings
    1. Clothing The Great Plains:a) BlackfootAs an Archaeologist: Wore long dresses with removable sleeves. Breech clothes and leggings. Moccasins, cloaks, or ponchos. The clothes are made out of: tanned animal hides, woven, knit plant fibres, deerskin, buckskin , and buffalo hide. They decorated their clothes with porcupine quills and elk teeth. As an Anthropologist: The tribe tanned their clothing and stitched hides together. In the summer, they wore thinner hides so they wouldn't get too hot. In the winter, the tribe wore thicker furs to stay warm. Also, they wore feathers on special occasions. b) Cree As an Archaeologist: The Cree used hides from animals such as buffalo, deer, and elk. These hides were tanned and decorated with quills, beads, and feathers. As an Anthropologist:The tribe tanned their clothing and stitched hides together. In the summer, they wore thinner hides so they wouldn't get too hot. In the winter, the tribe wore thicker furs to stay warm. Also, they wore feathers on special occasions.
    Arctic: a) Inuit:As an Archaeologist: The inuit wear boots called karniks. Also, they wear parkas, trousers, stockings, gloves and hoods. The Inuit frisked their clothing with snow and ice . Thread was made from animal sinew and most clothing is made from Caribou. Boots are made from seal skin and parkas are made from goose down. The tribe mostly made clothes out of rabbit fur, caribou, seal skin, or deer.
    As an Anthropologist: Women made the clothing for the tribe. They sewed the dry hides with needles made of ivory and thread made of animal sinew. They wore the kinds of clothes that they did to keep warm in ice-cold temperatures.
    Northwest Coast: a) Haida As an Archaeologist: The men and women wore cedar robes during the cooling time. The only difference is the women had a apron from their waist to their knees. In the winter, people wore otter furs, raccoon fur, wildcat, and other small animal hides. Men used seal skin and deerskin to create pants to keep them warm. Women within the tribe wore skirts, sarongs, and tunics. These clothes were primarily made from red cedar or deer skin. Capes were also worn by Haida tribe members (both men and women.) As an Anthropologist: They made clothes by smashing and soaking the bark of red or yellow cedar trees. They would then shred it and process it. To sew it together, they would use goat wool. They wore what they did because the materials were somewhat water proof and also had cultural significance, such as the chief of the tribe wore very expensive chilkat blankets.
    b) Nootka As an Archaeologist: he men and women wore cedar robes during the cooling time. The only difference is the women had a apron from their waist to their knees. In the winter, people wore otter furs, raccoon fur, wildcat, and other small animal hides. Men used seal skin and deerskin to create pants to keep them warm. Women within the tribe wore skirts, sarongs, and tunics. These clothes were primarily made from red cedar or deer skin. As an Anthropologist: They made clothes by smashing and soaking the bark of red cedar trees. They would then shred it and process it. They wore what they did because the materials were somewhat water proof and also had cultural significance (like feathers).
    Eastern Hunters: a) Algonquin As an Archaeologist: Wore deerskin, beaver, minx, martin, and bear skin hide shirts and hunting shorts to allow flexibility. As an Anthropologist: The Algonquin tribe used hides of lots of animals and were cured to soften the leather. They sometimes put their hair in a mohawk style using grease as gel. The clothing of this tribe varied as their region could be warm, cold, or bad weather. The clothes they chose did not affect movement because of their hunting style. Clothing pieces were detachable (e.g. long removable sleeves) to evade quick weather changes.
    b) Ojibwa As an Archaeologist: The Ojibwa tribe wore typically thin clothing made from animal skins such as deer or buffalo. As an Anthropologist: Clothes were made by curing animal skins and were decorated with shells, feathers, and dyed porcupine quills. Their clothing was thin and durable allowing them to be more agile for hunting.
    Eastern Farmers: a) Seneca As an Archaeologist: Seneca men wore breech cloths with leggings, and had traditional headdresses which are feathered caps. Women wore a long tunic called an overdress. Most Seneca wore moccasins as shoes. Most men wore moccasins as shoes. The materials used were: deerskin, plant fibers, porcupine quills. As an Anthropologist: The tribe made feather headdresses and deerskin moccasins by poking holes and sticking feathers and beads into them. To prepare the hide, the tribe would dry it out then sew it. They wore lighter animal hides because the weather is warm and also particular dress was culturally significant.
    b) Oneida As an Archaeologist:Oneida men wore breech cloths with leggings, and had traditional headdresses which are feathered caps. Women wore a long tunic called an overdress. Most Oneida wore moccasins as shoes.The materials used were: deerskin, plant fibers, porcupine quills. As an Anthropologist: The tribe made feather headdresses and deerskin moccasins by poking holes and sticking feathers and beads into them. To prepare the hide, the tribe would dry it out then sew it. They wore lighter animal hides because the weather is warm and also particular dress was culturally significant.
    c) MohawkAs an Archaeologist: Mohawk men wore breech cloths with leggings, and had traditional headdresses which are feathered caps. Women wore a long tunic called an overdress. Most Mohawks wore moccasins as shoes. Most men wore moccasins as shoes. The materials used were: deerskin, plant fibers, porcupine quills. As an Anthropologist: The tribe made feather headdresses and deerskin moccasins by poking holes and sticking feathers and beads into them. To prepare the hide, the tribe would dry it out then sew it. They wore lighter animal hides because the weather is warm and also particular dress was culturally significant.
    2. Transportation
    The Great Plains:
    a) Blackfoot
    As an Archaeologist: The blackfoot built rafts, dogs pulled sleds. They used horses after they were brought to North America.
    As an Anthropologist: The tribe would go to the river for recreation and fishing. They would go to the forest to hunt, pick berries. In fields they built settlements and hunted.They also traveled to meet up with other tribes for trade.
    b) CreeAs an Archaeologist: The Cree used dogsleds, snowshoes, toboggans, birch bark canoes, bull boats. As an Anthropologist:The tribe would go to the river for recreation and fishing. They would go to the forest to hunt, pick berries. In fields they built settlements and hunted.They also traveled to meet up with other tribes for trade.
    Arctic:
    a) Inuit:
    As an Archaeologist: The Inuit used kayaks that held 20 people. In the winter they used a big sled called a komatic. This sled walled pulled by a dog team. The Inuit also used one-man kayaks made of driftwood and seal skin.As an Anthropologist: They traveled to Northern Canada and places such as Labrador, Greenland, Alaska. The Inuit used a sled with a dog as dog didn't run out of fuel. Now snowmobiles are more popular.
    Northwest Coast:
    a) HaidaAs an Archaeologist: The Haida usually traveled by sea. They used huge war canoes. Each canoe was hollowed out of a single cedar tree and could hold about 50-60 warriors. They can withstand strong waves. Even other Northwest Coast Indian tribes, who all made impressive canoes, admired the canoes of the Haida.
    As an Anthropologist: The Haida lived on Stichewchew island and Queen Charlotte island. Both tribes mainly moved for the same reason: natural resources.
    b) NootkaAs an Archaeologist: The Nootka used to travel by horseback and oxen. Their main means of transportation was by water. They traveled in dug out canoes that could hold up to 60 people.
    As an Anthropologist: They traveled to the rugged part of Vancouver island by the pacific ocean. They moved there to gain more natural resources like fish, and water.
    Eastern Hunters:
    a) AlgonquinAs an Archaeologist: They traveled on foot and used birch wood canoes. In winter they used sleds and snowshoes.As an Anthropologist: The Algonquin traveled around the Hudson bay and what is now known as Ontario and Quebec. They sometimes traveled all the way to the Rockies and the Atlantic. The Algonquin tribe moved because of different food and water in different areas, which they needed depending on the seasons. They also may have moved if other tribes had invaded, or may have moved to warmer places in the winter and cooler places in the summer.
    b) OjibwaAs an Archaeologist: They usually travel on birch wood canoes and also on foot. In the winter they used toboggans. As an Anthropologist: The Ojibwa traveled to water sources and food like berries. The Ojibwa traveled to different places to get food and water.
    Eastern Farmers:
    a) Seneca. Oneida, Mohawk:As an Archaeologist: All three tribes used two types of canoes: one made from elm bark and was very fast, the other canoes was made out of hollow logs which they used for fishing. They didn't usually travel by canoes. They walked to a lot of their destinations. They used dogs to carry their supplies before the European Colonists came with horses. In the winter they used sleds and laced snowshoes to travel and carry supplies.
    As an Anthropologist: The Mohawk didn't travel much just to hunt and traveled by boat made by elm bark. They are the same. They traveled just because of hunting and most of them were from New York and traveled to Canada.
    3. FOOD The Great Plains:
    Northern Cree hunters hunted caribou, elk, and moose. Beaver, rabbits and buffalo were also common foods back then. For the Eastern Cree, fishing and hunting seals from canoes were important
    Cree women gathered nuts and fruits, from southern sets of the tribe, they also grew some corn. Some Cree Indian men pound pemmican, a traditional Cree food made from dried meat.
    Blackfoot
    The Blackfoot’s main food was buffalo. Blackfoot men usually hunted buffalo by chasing them off cliffs or following them with bow and arrow.
    Nuts and berries, and steamed camas roots were a treat to the Blackfoot .Wild rice was good with duck or in venison stews.
    The Cree and Blackfoot followed the buffalo so they wouldn’t have to travel far to hunt. They fished and set nets from canoes and they traveled by foot for berries. Same for Cree and Blackfoot.
    Was it hard to get food?
    · The winters made it hard because of the thick snow.
    · The summer was easier because there was no snow.
    · The fall was the easiest because the animals were all out.
    Same for Cree and Blackfoot.
    Arctic: a) Inuit:As an Archaeologist:
    As an Anthropologist:
    Northwest Coast:
    Haida, Nootka food
    As an archaeologist: Haida ate cod, smelt, herring, whale, seal, sea lion, sea otter, deer, elk, moose, beaver, wolves, bear, fox and mountain goat. Nootka ate roots sardines, and herring. They also gathered crab apples, berries, and ferns.
    As an archaeologist: haida were hunters and gatherers. They stored berries in bottles of whale or seal oil made of dry kelp. They also cooked into a mass and dried in the form of cake.
    As an anthropologist: For both Haida and Nootka it is sometimes quite hard for them to catch their food. Some of their hunting tools are wooden fishing weirs, tidal fish traps, nets, hooks, lines fishing spears and harpoons. It was hard for them to catch their food because they had to make all of these weapons and hunt down the animal. They also may have to fight another tribe member of for the animal.
    Eastern Hunters:
    a) Algonquin As an Archaeologist:
    As an Anthropologist:
    b) Ojibwa As an Archaeologist:
    As an Anthropologist:
    Eastern Farmers:
    As an Archaeologist:
    All three tribes ate corn, beans, squash, wild berries, herbs, deer elk and fish.
    The women in all three tribes planted crops of corn, beans, squash, and also picked berries and herbs to season the fish and meat. The men hunted deer and elk with bows, and went fishing on the deeper shores of Lake Ontario. Some of the traditional foods included cornbread, soups and stews that they cooked on a stone hearth.
    As an Anthropologist:
    They have three main crops. Corn, beans, and squash. They were called The Three Sisters. They planted crops or plants to get there food.
    Some of the three tribe’s foods for feasts were corn soup, corn bread, birch beer, and pork fried bread.
    4. SHELTER The Great Plains:
    The Cree had large buffalo-hide tents called tipis (or teepees).the Cree people moved around a lot and tipis were easy to move from place to place. The building of these shelters began with three poles. The men put the poles up after tying them together at the top to make a triangle. Then they leaned other poles between the three original ones, to make a circle. The women made large covers for the tipis from deer hides, moose skins and buffalo robes.
    For material they use deer hides, moose skins and buffalo robes. The support is used with logs or small trees. The teepee took as little as 14 and as many as 42 buffalo hides sewn together with sinew. They had a hole in the top for the smoke to get out of, and their door was on the east to shelter for wind.Cree uses bone fishhooks, spears, clubs, and knives. Nets, bow + arrow as weapons and tools
    Blackfoot uses Hide shields, clubs, and the bow + arrow as weapons and tools
    In winter tepees help the Cree and Blackfoot stays warm, tepees protect them too. From snow, rain, hail, winds, and other weather conditions. The tepees trap in heat because of the animal’s hides that the outside is made of and the fire in the middle of the tepees also keep them warm!!!
    Arctic: a) Inuit:As an Archaeologist:
    As an Anthropologist:
    NORTHWEST COAST
    Archaeologist
    What kind of shelter did Aboriginal people in this region use?
    Nootka: The Nootka lived in longhouses that were as large as 40 by 100 feet long. Up to 35 people would live in a longhouse.
    Haida: Haida houses were rectangular. They ranged between 25-33 meters long and could be up to 17 meters wide. Haida houses had a pitched roof.
    What materials did they use to build their shelters?
    Nootka: The Nootka lived in a cedar plank house. On the Doorway of their houses were big totem poles made of tree trunks. The houses were from 40-100 feet in length and 30-40 feet in width. The only ones who lived in each house were relatives.
    Haida: The Haida homes were usually very large and could hold over several 100 people. It took a lot of logs to build cedar homes. They were 8 meters high and 9-12 wide.
    What tools and weapons did they use in their daily life?
    Nootka: Nootka used knives, slings, bows and arrow, and stone clubs were the warriors favorite weapons and the chiefs used body armor.
    Haida: Haida used war canoes that had swivel guns. They also had forts with trapdoors, rolling log defense, and boulder traps. They used cannons, swivel guns, bows and arrows, and harpoon. They also made wooden helmets.
    Anthropologist
    How did their shelter protect them from the environment?
    Nootka: The Nootka used cedar bark protected them from snow in the winter. It also protected them from rain in the spring.
    Haida: Sometimes Haida houses had smoke holes in the top that had a board propped up protect the opening from rain and snow. The planks that formed the walls were not tightly lashed together so moss was used to seal the spaces.
    Eastern Hunters:
    Algonquin Archaeology
    -Algonquin lived in small villages of wigwams.
    -In hunting camps, smaller cone shaped wigwams were built.
    -Longhouses were also built.
    -Algonquin used birch bark for the roof and walls, and other woods for the frame.
    - Longhouses were made of wood and animal hides.
    -Algonquin weapons and tools included bows and arrows, spears, and the very useful knives.
    -Fishermen used pronged spears to stab fish from canoes or holes in the ice.
    -Blades were made of stone.
    -Snares were also used.
    Anthropology
    -The bark provided definite protection from wind.
    -Many people could fit in a large wigwam or a longhouse.
    -Rounded shape made snow fall off in winter.
    -Bark’s smoothness provided limited protection from rain.
    Eastern Farmers:
    As and Anthropologists:
    All three tribes were in charge of hunting, trading, and war. Most of the women were in charge of farming, property and family.
    5. ROLES AND BELIEFS The Great Plains:
    The Cree and Blackfoot did traditions such as quelling crafts, woodcarving, and bead work, storytelling and play instruments they did all sorts of traditions and ceremonies such as dancing and playing instruments (told already) and eating their pride hunting (they killed or caught) around the camp fire. They sing and pray they do so called the sun dance The men were hunters and fishers they sometimes went to war to protect their families. Cree women took care of the children they built their family's house gathered plants to eat and herbs to use for medicine.
    Arctic:
    a) Inuit:As an Archaeologist:
    As an Anthropologist:
    Northern Coast:
    As an anthropologist: The Nootka tribe celebrates by having potlatches a potlatch is a ceremonial feast. For example they would have a potlatch if a son or daughter is getting married. Also on normal days the women would do the cooking, but on special occasions the men did the cooking. They also have a celebration called an abstract. It is kind of like a festival with dancing and games. The kind of food they eat is salmon, herring halibut, elk, deer, bear, and berries.
    Eastern Hunters:
    -Women gathered plants, did most child care, and cooked.
    -Men usually hunted and went to war to protect the tribe, and were sometimes chiefs.
    - Both told stories, made artwork and music, and made and used medicine.
    -The leader of the tribe was the chief.
    -In the past, chiefs were always men, though today a woman can be chief.
    -The deer was a sacred animal, and Algonquin believed
    If a deer was shot in the head, evil spirits would be released.
    -In most ceremonies, dancing was an activity enjoyed by many people.
    -Men provided food and protection; women provided shelter, clothing, and cooking. Ojibwa children were expected to be obedient and helpful. The elder’s responsibility is to pass on the spiritual traditions. Wabojig led warriors from Chequamegon bay to battle in upstate Newyork. Ceremonies and beliefs were very valuable to the Ojibwa. Dancing is one way that they participated in ceremonies.
    EASTERN FARMERS
    As an Archaeologist
    All three tribes lived in long houses which were large wood frame buildings covered with elm bark. One of these could hold a whole tribe! (Up to sixty people). Some long houses can be 100 feet long! They also lived in wigwams (tipis) on hunting trips.
    All three tribes used wood, elm, bark, reed, and berries for paint, cedar, birch, sap, animal hides, rope, pegs, horse hair, and bear claws.
    Mohawk used bows and arrows, fisher men used spears and fishing poles in war they used clubs, spears and shields and bows and arrows. Also for tools they used hand axes for wood working, knives for skiing animals. The steamed wood for making bent wooden tools/ weapons. And they used wooden hasps for farming.
    As an Anthropologist
    They would build there long houses out of bark to prevent problems
    With cracks like animals, breeze, snow, rain, and even thieves. And had a large fence, called a palisade has stairs along the inside to use for good arrow aiming case of an attack. They had fire places that were dug into the corridor floor they used it to keep warm. And used for cooking there were smoke holes so the smoke would rise and go out. When it rained or snowed they would be able to close the holes.

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  3. page Science edited Chemistry Safety Rules! Please follow these for each experiment. Some examples will be posted upo…
    Chemistry Safety Rules!
    Please follow these for each experiment. Some examples will be posted upon completion.
    -Do not let chemicals come in contact with your skin
    -Rinse well, if you do get chemicals on yourself.
    -Wipe up spills immediately.
    -Wash your hands with soap
    -Never taste chemicals.
    -Waft, when smelling.
    -Label chemicals
    -Wear eye protection during experiments
    -Wear gloves to cover hands and protect from harmful substances
    -Use common sense in the lab!
    Student Examples of Safety Posters:
    {img-1101200-0001.pdf} {img-1101206-0001.pdf}
    {img-1101205-0001.pdf} {img-1101201-0001.pdf}
    Active Chemistry
    by: I. Schnell
    Inspired by chemistry, this game allows students to solidify their knowledge of how molecules behave in a solid, liquid, and gaseous form. This is how you play:
    1) Students are molecules in this elimination game.
    2) There are three states of matter: Solids (groups of 4), Liquids (groups of 3), and Gas (individual)
    3) Students start as gas, running around the gym
    4) Teacher calls out one of the following commands: Condensate (gas -> liquid (group of one to group of three), Evaporate (liquid to gas (3 to 1)), Melt (solid to liquid (4 to 1)), Freeze (liquid to gas (3 to 1)), Sublimate (solid to gas (4 to 1)).
    5) Each time an action is called, students form that group. Whoever is left out must sit out.
    To clarify:
    'Gas' is individual where students run around by oneself
    'Liquid' is in a group of three where students hold hands and run around in a loose unit
    'Solid' is a group of four where students link arms to form a tight, square-like unit
    I'll be trying this out and will make adjustments as necessary!
    Separating Matter!
    Adapted from the EPS Classroom Chemistry handbook:
    Mixture of solid and solid:
    a) Sieves: various gauges of sieves can be used to separate different sizes of solid particles
    b) Magnets: magnetic substances can be separated from non-magnetic ones
    c) Wind: light substances that can be moved by a light breeze can be separated from heavier substances that fall straight down in the breeze
    d) Water: floating materials can be separated from those that are heavier and subsequently sink
    Mixture of solid and liquid:
    a) Evaporating: Water is lost in the air as it evaporates leaving all solid matter behind (i.e. salt and water)
    b) Decanting: insoluble solids that settle out in water can be recovered by pouring off the water and letting the wet residue dry
    c) Filtering: insoluble solids can be stirred up to form a suspension which can then be poured into a filtering system. Water will pass through and solids will be collected.
    Mixture of a liquid and liquid:
    a) Decanting: where two liquids do not mix, the top liquid is paired off or removed with an eyedropper
    b) Distilling: heat the mixture. The vapor of the heated mixture collects in a tube then condenses back into it's liquid form.
    Mixture of a liquid and a gas:
    a) cold liquids including water will dissolve more gas than warm liquids. Heating will drive gas out of a solution.
    Mixture of a gas and a gas:
    a) Liquefying: cool the mixture of gases down until one becomes a liquid. This requires cooling to a very low temperature (-200 c). The liquid can easily be separated from gas.
    Keep in mind! Matter does not always remain the same! It may undergo change depending on the conditions. Sometime this change is IRREVERSIBLE! (discussed in class)
    Salt crystal
    We will document this experiment on the wiki weekly to show progression!
    Materials:
    Glass Jar
    Thread
    Spoon
    Warm water
    Paper Clip
    Popsicle Stick
    Salt
    Procedure:
    1. Fill a jar with warm to hot water. Add salt until saturated.
    2. Support the end of a thread to a Popsicle stick and placing it across the jar mouth.
    3. Leave undisturbed for several weeks.
    {Week1.JPG} WEEK 1: Solution is saturated with table salt. {week2.JPG} WEEK 2: Salt cystals begin to form. Residue forms at the top of the jar. {week3} Week 3

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  4. page Newsletters edited JANUARY 2011 Welcome back everyone to 2011! I sincerely hope that everyone had a great holiday an…
    JANUARY 2011
    Welcome back everyone to 2011! I sincerely hope that everyone had a great holiday and is ready to return to the realities of school and work. The students of 5S have been working very hard over the past few months, completing large projects with 5C in Social Studies and tackling several units in math are just a few of the accomplishments made by the students. They have gone through a lot, however, as they progress to grade 6, the workload will continue to grow. Here is what is happening in 5S over the remainder of January:
    MATH: We are beginning a unit on division in math this month. Students are strongly encouraged to be practicing their division skills at home EVERY night, as practice makes perfect. We will be likewise honing our skills during class time through the use of games, drills, and textbook lessons.
    SOCIAL: In social studies this month, students will be commencing ‘Part B’ of the social studies curriculum: Canada’s history. Students will be guided, via a timeline, through important dates and events that shaped our country into what it is today. Over the month of January, we will be focusing on First Nation peoples: how they lived off the land in each region of Canada and hoe life may have differed based on location.
    SCIENCE: It’s time for a student favourite, Classroom Chemistry! In this new Science unit, student will experience how solids, liquids, and gases react with one another. Students are encouraged to follow safety rules, which will be collaboratively created in class early this month.
    LANGUAGE ARTS: A new year brings about many new experiences in Language Arts this month. For instance, I am beginning a home reading program where students are required to read a novel each month. At the end of the month, students are required to write me a report based on several questions (this will be provided in class along with a reading log to record how much is being done each night). I encourage students to be reading AT LEAST 15 minutes a night in order to develop strong reading skills. Each report will be due on the first of the following month.
    Students will begin our very first novel study of the year: Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone. This book deals with many themes that preteens (such as the 5s this year) face through interactions with friends, bullies, parents, and teachers. Students will be put into houses, as each student at Hogwarts School is, to involve them in the story a little more. The kids will earn points for their house through meeting objectives such as ALL HOMEWORK DONE or FIRST TO BE CLEANED UP AT THE END OF THE DAY. As with all competitions, this winning group will receive some sort of prize commending it’s victory. Best of luck!!
    DECEMBER 2010
    Dear parents of 5s,
    I would like to first and foremost begin this newsletter by thanking all parents and guardians of students for attending parent-teacher interviews this past month. It was great to meet up with everyone and open those lines of communication between one another. As I have mentioned before in both person and newsletter, please contact me if there are any concerns in order to catch and issues that may arise early enough to deal with them effectively or to simply drop me a line concerning what goes on in the classroom. Also, thank you everyone for dealing with the vast amount of sickness that has been going around. It seems everyone is doing his or her part by keeping those who are sick at home and also notifying the school of absences.
    December is looking to be a fairly busy month as students and teachers alike are concluding units before the two weeklong break for the holidays and juggling Christmas Concert work at the same time. This is the final stretch, so I encourage my students not to get into holiday mode quite yet! At the end of our hard work this month, I will throw a small party for the kids to relax the day before the break (the 21st). The room representative, (Mrs. Theriault, may be contacting a few parents to help out with supplies.
    Onward to academia, here’s a look into what will be going on over the next month is 5s:
    Math: In Math this month, we will be concluding our Multiplication unit. I have seen many student progress in their math skills and hope to see continued growth throughout the year. I am stressing to students that although we may finish a chapter on multiplication, it is applicable to many other units and must be practiced (multiplication.com is great for this!). Therefore I will request once more: PRACTICE PRACTICE PRACTICE!
    Social: Social Studies part A is drawing to a close as students are completing their projects on a specific region of Canada. This month, students will be completing and presenting their work for Mr. Coffin and I to view. It looks like their hard work thus far is paying off and I am looking forward to seeing the results. Good job class!
    Science: This will be the final month for out Weather Watch unit. Over the past few weeks, students have been exposed to how violent weather is formed, how to measure the weather, and what to wear in certain situations. This month, we will conclude by studying the water cycle and types of clouds.
    IMPORTANT DATES
    December 1: Early Dismissal
    December 6-10: 5 days of Christmas
    December 8: Bake Sale
    December 15: Christmas Concert
    December 21: Last day of School
    NOVEMBER 2010
    A message from Mr. S,
    Hello all and my apologies for the tardiness of my newsletter (that is, for October). Life in 5S has been increasingly busier as we are experiencing more holidays, events, school projects, and tests. Everything has been flowing well. Students are adapting well to grade 5 and I look forward to each day with the students. We have a great balance of fun and learning and students seem to be happy to come to school each day.
    On November 3, parent-teacher interview forms will be sent home with students. Please ensure to complete these and send them back to the school ASAP. I will be contacting parents to confirm times once I place them.
    I would like to conclude my blurb by saying thank you to all the parents that helped out with the Halloween party on Friday, October 29. It went well and our haunted gym was alarmingly brilliant.
    Finally, if you ever need to contact me, please do not hesitate to email me at: Isaac.schnell@blackgold.ca.
    Best,
    Isaac Schnell
    Math in 5S
    Students are now onto their third unit: Adding and Subtracting Decimals. To help students in this unit, I encourage parents to quiz kids with money problems (ex. What is the total cost of this bill?). This will help students realize the “real life” importance of this math concept.
    Social Studies
    For the next few weeks, students have been given a group task (with class 5C) that involves researching a region of Canada. Students are responsible for coming up with the product and process for this assignment as it is a student-centered project. I look forward to seeing the creative ways that the kids decide to show their information about their region!
    Language Arts
    For the past month we have been working on the 7 writing traits. Students are now writing creative stories for Language Arts class which will integrate what they have learned about proper and interesting writing.
    Science
    In 5S, we have just begun our Weather Watch unit. Students will be exposed to all different kinds of weather and learn about what causes things such as tornados and hurricanes. To help at home, please have your child watch or read weather forecasts to keep up with our ever changing weather!
    Classroom Updates and important upcoming events:
    November 1- ATA institute day
    November 2- Board Visit
    November 8- Remembrance Day ceremony
    November 11- Remembrance Day
    November 12- Mid-term break
    November 22- Report Cards sent out
    November 23/24- Parent-teacher interviews
    November 30- Assembly
    September 2010,
    Welcome back to a brand new school year! This year in grade 5, students will be learning about many new things as well as expanding on and utilizing what they already know. This year my main focus is providing students with a safe and comfortable learning environment and the essential skills to perform in grade six. For updates on what’s going on in my classroom as well as homework updates, please visit my wiki page at 5chnell.wikispaces.com. I look forward to a new class and a new year!
    In regards to academia, the following is a brief rundown of what will be happening in class in the upcoming weeks:
    Language Arts:
    Students will learn and use the “7 good writing traits” in order to enhance their written work. They will also be taught how to make a proper poster and powerpoint through a list of criteria that they must be attentive to for each and every project this school year. These skills will be useful for the entirety of the students’ educational career as they allow for proper planning and organization.
    Mathematics:
    This month, students will refresh their memories by reviewing basic skills such as addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division. Afterward,
    we will begin Chapter One: patterns in mathematics in the Math Focus 5 textbook. This chapter involves students representing patterns using mathematical expressions, describing and extending patterns, and solving equations.
    Science
    In science this month, we will begin our shockingly interesting unit on electricity and magnetism. It will pull you in! This unit will engage students in experiments and investigations. We will look into electricity safety, how lights and circuits work, wiring and batteries, conductors, resistors, and measuring electricity use.
    Social
    In social studies this year the primary focus is the nation we live in: Canada. Students will embark on a journey through each region of Canada and learn about the people and history contained within them. W e begin by discussing what each region is and what qualities the people who live there have.
    Second Language
    Second languages will begin on September 7th. Students will be given the choice as to what subject they wish to take: Spanish or French. More information will be given to the students when school resumes.
    IMPORTANT DAYS IN SEPTEMBER:
    September 1- First day back!
    September 6- Labour day (no school)
    September 10- Funds due for agendas
    September 14- Meet the staff BBQ
    September 17- PD Day (no school)
    September 30- Terry Fox Run

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  5. page Language Arts edited Holes webquest: http://www.columbia.k12.mo.us/pke/kline/holes.html Harry Potter work groups: Ra…
    Holes webquest:
    http://www.columbia.k12.mo.us/pke/kline/holes.html
    Harry Potter work groups:
    Ravenclaw: Chapters 10 and 15
    Gryffindor: 13 and 16
    Slytherin: 11 and 14
    Hufflepuff: 12 and 17

    BOOK REPORTS:
    Due: The first of every month.
    ...
    4) What is your favorite part of the novel? Least favorite part?
    5) If you could change the story in any way, how would you change it?
    ...
    of every month! Reading logs willmonth and are to be checked each weekpresented to ensure they are being completed. the class.
    You know about the reviews in advance. I will not accept ANY excuses for missed deadlines!
    Have fun reading and I look forward to your reports!
    We now have our house assignments! Please check the board regularly to see how many points your house has!
    {Gryf.jpg} {ravenb.jpg} {huffle.jpg} {slyth.jpg}
    {harry_potter-logo_90894o.jpg}
    We
    We will have
    ...
    follows:
    Professor Schnell is is the headmaster
    ...
    students are:
    Megan
    Kailey C.
    Mika
    Ivy
    Zach

    Professor Coffin is is the headmaster
    ...
    students are:
    Brooklynn
    Taylor
    Damian
    Carson
    Jason

    Professor Prenioslo is is the headmistress
    ...
    students are:
    Jacob
    Shaelynn
    Jeremiah
    Lily
    Christian

    Professor Wiegman is is the headmistress
    ...
    students are:
    Jordan
    Ravreet
    Kaige
    Kailey S.
    Brendan

    The Sorting Hat has spoken!
    Rubric for Harry Potter film/ novel comparison
    You Be The Critic - Final Activity
    Good
    10-7 pts
    Fair
    6-3 pts
    Poor
    2-0 pts
    The Critical Event
    Good Summary adequately describes the scene using vivid language and examples from the novel. The impact on the plot is thoroughly explained. The image in the novel is described thoroughly with enough detail for anyone to envision the scene. It is explained, using several points(more than 2), how the director has changed the story by deleting or changing this scene.
    Fair Summary partially describes the scene using some vivid language and 1 or 2 examples from the novel. The impact on the plot is partially explained. The image in the novel is described partially with some detail for some people to envision the scene. It is explained, using 1 or 2 points, how the director has changed the story by deleting or changing this scene.
    Poor Summary inadequately describes the scene using little vivid language and almost no examples from the novel. The impact on the plot is barely explained. The image in the novel is described with barely enough detail for anyone to envision the scene. It is poorly explained without any points as to how the director has changed the story by deleting or changing this scene.
    The Review
    Good You have made a clear choice as to which version of the story you liked best. You have thoroughly explained several parts (3 or 4) you liked and or disliked. You have described your favorite part and your favorite character and cited several (3 or 4) examples of why these are your favorite. You have written about a surprising twist in the story and used 3 to 4 specific examples from the novel/movie to explain it.
    Fair You have made a choice as to which version of the story you liked best. You have partially explained several parts (2 or 3) you liked and or disliked. You have described your favorite part and your favorite character and cited several (2 or 3) examples of why these are your favorite. You have written about a surprising twist in the story and used 2 to 3 specific examples from the novel/movie to explain it.
    Poor You have not made a clear choice as to which version of the story you liked best. You have explained only a small part you liked and or disliked. You have poorly described your favorite part and your favorite character and only cited one example of why these are your favorite. You have written about a surprising twist in the story and used only one examples from the novel/movie to explain it.
    Composition
    Good You have several
    (3 or 4) examples from the novel/movie to back up each of your opinions for each of the different aspects of the story. You have written in paragraph form and have organized your thoughts properly. Each section is labeled.
    Fair You have several
    (2 or 3) examples from the novel/movie to back up each of your opinions for each of the different aspects of the story. You have written partially in paragraph form and have loosely organized your thoughts. Most or some sections are labeled.
    Poor You have a couple (1 or 2) examples from the novel/movie to back up each of your opinions for each of the different aspects of the story. You have written one paragraph and have barely organized your thoughts. Some or no sections are labeled.
    Mechanics
    Good You have thoroughly edited, revised, checked spelling and used proper grammar in your work.
    Fair You have partially edited, revised, checked spelling and mostly used proper grammar in your work.
    Poor You have barely edited, revised, checked spelling and sparingly used proper grammar in your work.
    THIS ASSIGNMENT IS EXPECTED TO BE 3 PAGES (DOUBLE SPACED) WITH SIZE 12 FONT (USING CALIBRI, ARIAL, OR TIMES NEW ROMAN FONTS. PLEASE USE ONE OF THE PREVIOUS FONTS TO MAKE SURE YOU ARE MEETING THE CRITERIA. FINALLY, PLEASE INCLUDE THE AMOUNT OF WORDS USED IN THE COMPARISON (WE WILL GO OVER HOW TO DO THIS IN CLASS). ALL THE CRITERIA IS AVAILABLE IN THE PREVIOUS RUBRIC. PLEASE READ THROUGH IT THOROUGHLY!!!!

    Writing a short story:
    A great walkthrough of how to construct plot for a short story! This is the same website used in class to demonstrate plot and point of view: http://www.learner.org/interactives/literature/read/plot1.html
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  6. page Jobs edited Handouts: 1. Ivy 2. Kailey C Office: 1. Jason Milk: 1. Megan 2. Mika 3. Jeremiah Boar…
    Handouts:
    1. Ivy
    2. Kailey C

    Office:
    1. Jason
    Milk:
    1. Megan
    2. Mika
    3. Jeremiah
    Board:
    1. Brooklynn
    Boards:
    Floor:
    Desks:

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  7. page HOMEWORK edited May 30 Chapter 9 summary for the Incredible Journey Book report for Wednesday! Camp Warwa form …
    May 30
    Chapter 9 summary for the Incredible Journey
    Book report for Wednesday!
    Camp Warwa form
    May 27
    Math aquariums due Monday
    Math ch 8 test on Monday
    Social WW1 questions
    May 24
    Math: Aquarium Blueprint
    La: Blogpost for chapter 7
    Bake sale tomorrow
    May 19
    Math chapter review
    May 17
    Math page 284 #1-12
    Blog post for Incredible Journey
    Grocery bag from home (will discuss in class tomorrow)
    May 16
    Math page 280 #1-7
    Spanish page 21 actividad 7
    May 9
    Math page 266 #1-3
    Book Orders due May 12th
    May 3, 2011
    Language Arts: Blog post on Chapter One of The Incredible Journey
    Bring back sexual education forms
    May 2, 2011
    Math chapter review: Test tomorrow!
    La: Incredible Journey pg 1 (booklet)
    Science: Wetland picture
    April 27
    Math page 162 #2-10
    Other: Edmonton Opera Visit tomorrow!
    Social: Finish immigration first person story and gather pictures for photostory
    April 5, 2011
    Math page 124/125 #2-8
    LA Idiom
    Early Dismissal tomorrow
    April 4, 2011
    Math title page (Chapter 4)
    LA hyperbole poem + picture
    Science Shoebox
    March 22, 2011
    Math page 239 #2
    Book Reports for April 4
    Math exam Friday
    March 16, 2011
    Math Page 236 #6-13
    Wear Green Tomorrow!
    March 15, 2011
    Math Page 236 #1-5
    March 14, 2011
    Math Page 232 #2,3
    Social Personal Response on Debate
    Student Led conference forms
    March 11, 2011
    Math page 173 #1-12
    LA: Fable
    Student Led forms
    FIELD TRIP FORMS MONDAY
    Remember to change clocks! Spring Ahead on the 13th.
    March 10, 2011
    Math page 169 #1-7
    LA page 99 part C for Friday
    Student led form ASAP
    March 9, 2011
    Language Arts: Page99 part C for Friday
    Feb 28, 2011
    BOOK REPORTS
    Feb 23, 2011
    Math probability projects due tomorrow
    Current Events report due Friday
    Book Report due March 1st
    Feb 22. 2011
    Math probability projects due tomorrow
    Current Events report due Friday
    Book Report due March 1st
    Feb 16, 2011
    Science Mechanisms using electricity title page
    Mirror of Erised for tomorrow
    Feb 15, 2011
    Mirror of Erised for Thursday
    Habitant short story for tomorrow
    Feb 14, 2011
    Math: Page 352/353 #1-8
    LA: Harry Potter workbook chapters 7, 8, 9. Read chapter 12.
    JANUARY 28, 2011
    BOOK REPORT FOR TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 1
    JANUARY 26, 2011
    Math: Page 329 #2-6 (Omit #5)
    Spanish test tomorrow
    JANUARY 25, 2011
    BAKE SALE TOMORROW
    Math pg 345/346 #2-8
    JANUARY 24, 2011
    BAKE SALE WEDNESDAY
    Read chapter 7 of Harry Potter
    Read chapter 23 of Holes
    Spanish calendars
    JANUARY 21, 2011
    Reading Logs
    JANUARY 20, 2011
    Math: 320 #9-15, not 13
    Spanish: Calendarios para el 25 de enero
    JANUARY 19, 2011
    Math: 320 #1-8, 13
    LA: Ch 3/4 up to end of writing for tomorrow
    JANUARY 17, 2011
    Math: Page 315/316 #2-12
    L.A.: Chapter 3/4 Harry Potter workbook. Holes up to chapter 15
    Spanish: Los Calendarios para el 25 de enero.
    Wear pink tomorrow!
    JANUARY 14, 2011
    Math: Mid chapter review
    JANUARY 13, 2011
    Math: Page 310 #2-10
    L.A.- Reading log check tomorrow!
    Needles tomorrow afternoon
    JANUARY 12, 2011
    L.A.: Harry Potter chapter 2 questions. Holes read up to chapter 8 and complete word search in Holes package.
    Health: Think of resolutions to make for next Wednesday health class
    Return field trip form
    JANUARY 11th, 2011
    Math: Page 306 #3-8 (omit #6)
    L.A.: Read Harry Potter ch 2. Ch. 1 questions in booklet
    JANUARY 10th, 2011
    Math: Page 303 #1-6
    L.A.: Reading log (will be checked Friday), Read chapter 1 of Harry Potter, Chapter 1-6 of Holes
    Science: Review "Separating Matter" notes posted under science. If you were absent, please take them down in your notebook (or a piece of paper) to bring to school
    Lice check tomorrow!
    Return field trip forms.
    JANUARY 7th, 2011
    Math: Page 300 #3ace, 4ab, 5, 6, 7ac, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12
    L.A.: Reading log
    Other: Bring back signed field trip form
    JANUARY 6th, 2011
    Math: Get test signed/ correct it if you were told to do so
    Science: Safety posters
    L.A.: Reading log
    JANUARY 5th, 2011
    Math: Division title page for tomorrow
    Science: Chem. title page for tomorrow
    Chem safety poster for Friday
    L.A.: Harry Potter/ Holes title page for tomorrow
    Begin reading sheet
    Social: Title page for tomorrow

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  8. page home edited Quick look: -"Language Arts" incredible journey blog: http://kidblog.org/incrediblejo…

    Quick look:
    -"Language Arts" incredible journey blog: http://kidblog.org/incrediblejourney/
    -"HOMEWORK" updated daily!!
    -Science weebly website link: http://bisonbison.weebly.com/index.html
    -Social WW1 quest- http://www.civilization.ca/cwm/games/overtop/index_e.shtml
    -20 questions- http://us.akinator.com/
    CHOICES FOR YEAR END WEBQUEST:
    http://www.blackgold.ab.ca/ict/Divison2/wetlands5/index.htm -Wetlands
    http://www.blackgold.ab.ca/ict/Divison2/FamousFive/index.htm -Famous 5
    http://www.blackgold.ab.ca/ict/Divison2/News/index.htm -News Report
    http://education.iupui.edu/webquests/knights/knight.htm -A day as a knight
    Important Dates:
    CLASS 5S: LEDUC ESTATES SCHOOL
    {photo2.JPG}
    ...
    and homework assignments (perfectassignments. I wish remind both parents and students that if you missone is absent, it is his or her responsibility to find out what was missed that day. I encourage students to have a day!).classroom buddy who can communicate what was covered in class and whatever homework there may be. Also, there
    ...
    classmates questions. JustKids, just remember to
    ...
    can view EVERYTHING!
    Similarly, parents, please check this website if your child is absent so he or she can catch up on what was missed during the day. This is especially important as we are experiencing a greater volume of work as the year progresses. Thank
    EVERYTHING you in advance.post!
    Looking forward to a great new year,
    -Mr. (Señor) Schnell
    CLASSROOM UPDATE:
    The following is a list of subjects being covered in 5S at the moment:
    Language Arts: Novel study (Incredible Journey), Grammar lessons on subjects/ adjectives, and typing practice.
    Mathematics: Geometry (Textbook chapter 5)
    Social: Time line of Canada- Currently covering early immigration to Canada
    Science: Wetlands
    Español: Cuentas

    Social:
    Science:
    Español:

    External Sites of importance:
    For online activities regarding classroom subjects: http://www.blackgold.ab.ca/ict/Divison2/IndexdivisionII.htm
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Tuesday, June 21

  1. page home edited ... -Social WW1 quest- http://www.civilization.ca/cwm/games/overtop/index_e.shtml -20 questions- …
    ...
    -Social WW1 quest- http://www.civilization.ca/cwm/games/overtop/index_e.shtml
    -20 questions- http://us.akinator.com/
    CHOICES FOR YEAR END WEBQUEST:
    http://www.blackgold.ab.ca/ict/Divison2/wetlands5/index.htm -Wetlands
    http://www.blackgold.ab.ca/ict/Divison2/FamousFive/index.htm -Famous 5
    http://www.blackgold.ab.ca/ict/Divison2/News/index.htm -News Report
    http://education.iupui.edu/webquests/knights/knight.htm -A day as a knight

    CLASS 5S: LEDUC ESTATES SCHOOL
    {photo2.JPG}
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    8:50 am
  2. 8:48 am

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